Rachel Whiteread | Tate Britain

‘Negative spaces’ is the concept behind British contemporary artist Rachel Whiteread’s latest exhibition at Tate Britain. When entering the gallery, you’ll quickly discover just how the negative spaces take on a life of their own, constructed entirely from grey and white geometric shapes ranging from the mundane to the monumentally striking. These negative spaces eventually take on a life of their own, and gives an interesting perspective on our daily lives, to appreciate what isn’t there.

"incredible detailing"

Rachel Whiteread at Tate Britain

There’s also a selection of cast everyday objects, ranging from the smaller things like hot water bottles and mattresses, to a full-scale copy of the staircase from Whiteread’s own home located in Bethnal Green. One of our highlights is a plaster-cast of Room 101 from the BBC Broadcasting House, a room that’s got an arguably firm cultural standing across the UK. Room 101 was even focused upon in George Orwell’s acclaimed Nineteen Eighty-Four, with an already haunting atmosphere, this is only amplified by the incredible detailing left in Whiteread’s cast.

These casts of architecture, objects and spaces are one of Whiteread’s trademarks, harnessing plaster, concrete, resin, rubber and metal as her tools, the final products are completed to an astounding level of quality and beauty. As the final artist commissioned to fill Trafalgar Square’s famous empty fourth plinth, Whiteread has also won a Turner Prize for her full size cast of a house in the East End that was made back in 1993.

"instantly recognisable"

Rachel Whiteread artist

The entirety of this exhibition is presented with grand scale, quality, and attention to detail. Picking up the highlights from across Whiteread’s career, instantly recognisable pieces, as well as the latest works that are being presented for the first time now. To find out more information, please see the details below. The exhibition is open until the 21st January 2018.